Explore the world of WWF

People, wildlife and the environment are all interlinked.

Tackling the urgent threat of climate change and helping to change the way we live are just some of the ways we’re helping develop a world where people and wildlife thrive. Our Green Ambassador Explore posters takes a close look at some of our planet’s most threatened species and the places they call home. They’re packed full of fascinating facts, engaging activities, and information on how we can all help to safeguard their futures.

READY, STEADY, GROW!
#Plant2Plate

We are delighted to launch our second year of our hugely popular Plant2Plate campaign which is part of our Green Ambassador scheme. Our Plant2Plate campaign focuses on what can be done to produce and consume food in a sustainable way that’s less harmful to our shared planet and healthier for us.

START EXPLORING THE WORLD OF WWF

WILDLIFE

Get up close with gorillas, polar bears and many more amazing creatures and learn what makes them such fascinating creatures and why ensuring their survival is so important. Read more →

FOOD & GROWING FOOD

A recent WWF survey shows that parents and children these days really are open to growing food that’s healthier for them – and the planet too, and it’s schools that are key places for them to learn what to do. Read more →

FORESTS

The majority of WWF’s work focusses on the topic of putting an end to deforestation and degradation around the world.  Much of the timber and wooden products entering the UK come directly from the habitat of some of the world’s most iconic and endangered animals. Read more →

OCEANS

On our beautiful blue planet, the sea covers more than 70% of the surface and provides livelihoods and food for hundreds of millions of people. But the world’s oceans, seas and coasts are under severe strain. Read more →

RIVERS

From kingfishers to caimans, herons to hippos, an amazing range of animals and plants call rivers their home. We’re committed to protecting freshwater environments and wildlife – whether it’s oysters in the UK or river dolphins in the Amazon. Read more →